Leading Museums, Museum Leaders

AWMM Wildlife Photographer of the Year:

‘The Moment’ by Yongqing Bao of China.

Laine Moger, Wildlife Photographer of the Year: The ‘inspiring’ images coming to Auckland, Stuff, 23 February 2020

The world’s best nature photography from more than 100 countries will soon be on display.

The Wildlife Photographer of the Year exhibition, which features more than 100 images, is arriving at Auckland Museum direct from London.

Now in its 55th year, the competition is the longest running and most prestigious photography competition in the world.

It is organised by the Natural History Museum, London.

The museum’s director of science, Dr Tim Littlewood, who was also a member of the competition’s judging panel, said photography had a unique ability to spark conversation, debate and action.

“For more than 50 years this competition has attracted the world’s very best photographers, naturalists and young photographers, but there has never been a more important time for audiences all over the world to experience their work in our inspiring and impactful exhibition,” he said.

“We hope this year’s exhibition will empower people to think differently about our planet and our critical role in its future.”

Snow Exposure by United States photographer Max Waugh won the Black and White category. Max Waugh.

A panel of international experts selected the awarded images from nearly 50,000 entries.

Among the winners was 14-year-old Aucklander Cruz Erdmann, who won the title of Young Wildlife Photographer of the Year for his snap of a big fin squid illuminating the inky blackness of the ocean.

Wildlife Photographer of the Year was founded in 1965 by BBC Wildlife Magazine, then called Animals.

The Natural History Museum joined forces with the magazine in 1984 to create the competition as it is known today.

It is now solely run and owned by the Natural History Museum

The first exhibition attracted 361 entries. Today, the competition receives more than 48,000 entries anually.

Night Glow by Aucklander Cruz Erdmann won the 11-14 years old category. Cruz Erdman.

A panel of international experts selected the awarded images from nearly 50,000 entries.

Among the winners was 14-year-old Aucklander Cruz Erdmann, who won the title of Young Wildlife Photographer of the Year for his snap of a big fin squid illuminating the inky blackness of the ocean.

Wildlife Photographer of the Year was founded in 1965 by BBC Wildlife Magazine, then called Animals.

The Natural History Museum joined forces with the magazine in 1984 to create the competition as it is known today.

It is now solely run and owned by the Natural History Museum

The first exhibition attracted 361 entries. Today, the competition receives more than 48,000 entries anually.

Land of the eagle by Audun Rikardsen, Norway.

Visitors can view the exhibition for free at the Auckland Museum from February 28.

Auckland Museum director Dr David Gaimster said it was a “privilege” to offer the world-class exhibition free to Aucklanders.

All of the images will be illuminated for visitors to experience up close and in person.

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Council of Australasian Museum Directors, c/o Ms Daryl Karp, Museum of Australian Democracy at Old Parliament House PO Box 3934 Manuka, Australian Capital Territory 2603 Australia, © CAMD 2020
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